The Most Emotional Scene In Hachiko: A Dog’s Story


Legendary Loyal Dog, Hachiko, Forever Reunited With His Human

In 1924, Hidesaburō Ueno, a professor in the agriculture department at the University of Tokyo, took Hachikō, a golden brown Akita, as a pet. During his owner’s life, Hachikō greeted him at the end of each day at the nearby Shibuya Station. The pair continued their daily routine until May 1925, when Professor Ueno did not return. The professor had suffered a cerebral hemorrhage and died, never returning to the train station where Hachikō was waiting. Each day for the next nine years, nine months and fifteen days, Hachikō awaited Ueno’s return, appearing precisely when the train was due at the station.

Hachikō attracted the attention of other commuters. Many of the people who frequented the Shibuya train station had seen Hachikō and Professor Ueno together each day. Initial reactions from the people, especially from those working at the station, were not necessarily friendly. However, after the first appearance of the article about him on October 4, 1932 in Asahi Shimbun, people started to bring Hachikō treats and food to nourish him during his wait.

Hachikō died on March 8, 1935

Eventually, Hachikō’s legendary faithfulness became a national symbol of loyalty, particularly to the person and institution of the Emperor.

Today, a bronze statue of Hachiko sits in his waiting spot outside the Shibuya railroad station.

Images from the movie “Hachi: A Dog’s Tale” with Richard Gere and Joan Allen

“The world would be a nicer place if everyone had the ability to love as unconditionally as a dog.”
――――――――――――――――――――――――――――――――――――――M.K. Clinton

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